Naked Shakespeare Women's 1 Henry IV - part 2

There’s no denying that Shakespeare’s women are great characters. At a time when female actors were practically non-existent and female parts were played by men, nothing deterred The Bard from writing great roles and speeches for his ladies. Shakespeare loved women. He imbues his great female characters with all the qualities he so admired about the fairer sex, giving them twisting plots and engaging dialogue. Here are my favorites among Shakespeare’s women.

Shakespeare Women: 'Much Ado About Nothing'.

"Phyllis Rackin has provide us with a deftly defined casebook for the reconsideration of feminist criticism in the twenty-first century that looks to the future through a clear articulation of that criticism's past ... In each chapter, Rackin provides an alternative to the limiting assumptions she describes and thus offers brave new ways of seeing ... In focusing on the question of Shakespeare and women in the twenty-first century, Phyllis Rackin has renewed a sense of the feminist agenda within the field of Shakespeare studies." - Rebecca Laroche, Shakespeare Quarterly "Believing that historical research can provide rich resources to revitalize feminist criticism (if one looks for them), Rackin ably and amply points the way. She examines the place(s) of women in Shakespeare's world; the tendency to shape the canon in the reader's own image; the powerful truths Shakespeare offers about women (notably in Cleopatra) and life, truths evident despite or sometimes because of the use of boy actors; Shakespeare's 'complicated negotiation with the Petrachan tradition' in the sonnets, which succeed, while addressing both sexes, in enabling women to think and feel honestly about themselves; and the continuous contemporaneousness ofShakespeare's women. The 'Further Reading' section is a vein of rich ore. Essential." - Choice

Shakespeare and women Lesson plan - TeachingEnglish

How does Shakespeare treat women in his plays Despite the relative insignificance of women in Elisabethan social order, Shakespeare uses them in many significant ways. He seems to be extremely sensitive to the importance of women in society even though they are often overlooked. The idea that men are often a product of the women in their lives is indirectly suggested in the significant impact women have on men in the plays. Isabella has a profound influence in the lives of Angelo and Claudio; Desdemona, by no true fault of her own, turns out to be both a blessing and a curse in the life of Othello; Cleopatra is a major cause of Antony’s downfall. Although having little respect in the social order of Elisabethan society, Shakespeare recognises women as a real and significant part of society. Like all aspects of Shakespeare’s plays, the female characters play a significant role in contributing to plot and theme.

Introducing Shakespeare's Women in His Plays

"Phyllis Rackin has provide us with a deftly defined casebook for the reconsideration of feminist criticism in the twenty-first century that looks to the future through a clear articulation of that criticism's past ... In each chapter, Rackin provides an alternative to the limiting assumptions she describes and thus offers brave new ways of seeing ... In focusing on the question of Shakespeare and women in the twenty-first century, Phyllis Rackin has renewed a sense of the feminist agenda within the field of Shakespeare studies." - Rebecca Laroche, Shakespeare Quarterly

Was Shakespeare a woman? - The Globe and Mail